Students interested in applying for the Women's Leadership Program (WLP) must apply for admission to George Washington University using the Common Application. Learn More
Current and former WLP students have many opportunities for scholarships and fellowships. Learn More

Globalization, Economics and Business

The Globalization, Economics and Business Leadership Program is designed to create a stimulating community of women who wish to incorporate an intensive study of the humanities and economics as well as active debates about the future of a globalized world into their Freshman experience.

Overview

What is globalization and why has is raised voices and tempers across the political spectrum? How can economics influence our intended altruism in the developing world? Where will the US stand at the end of the housing crisis when a new administration comes into office?

These are some of the most challenging and compelling current questions in economics and business and their relevance stretches across a wide variety of fields: economics, international business, international affairs, sociology, international development and political science, to name a few. These are typical of the questions we study in the Globalization, Economics and Business Cohort.

As all of the WLP cohorts, the GEB cohort is designed to combine a rigorous academic program with out-of-classroom experiences to enrich cohort members’ academic and professional development. As part of the GEB cohort, you will reside on the Mount Vernon Campus with other members of the cohort and a graduate teaching assistant who lives in the same residence hall. The cohort coordinator is both the faculty instructor for the economics and symposium sequences as well as an academic advisor and mentor. Important for all the WLP cohorts is the small class size (in WLP courses) and direct access to a graduate assistant and GW faculty members.

Academic Program

The academic program of GEB has three important pieces:
  • a two semester sequence in “Principles of Economics,” (introductory level micro and macro economics courses);
  • a two semester sequence in intensive writing; and
  • a two semester evening symposium series.

Fall Semester

Course Area Credits
Economics 011 Social Science 3

ECON 011

WLP Humanities Seminar Humanities 3

WLP 20

This course fulfils one Humanities requirement.

A writing-intensive seminar that emphasizes critical reading skills, concepts of disciplinarity, and processes of producing and legitimating knowledge for women in humanities. Each cohort includes a WLP 020 course, and texts and emphasis vary according to cohort. The course is taught by a member of the WLP University Writing faculty.

Symposium   1

WLP 110 and WLP 111

This course does not fulfill an academic requirement, but counts towards the students overall earned credit-hours.

The WLP Symposium is designed to supplement the academic component of the program with a wide variety of extra-curricular opportunities, many of which are exclusive to members of WLP. Symposia fall into two main categories: women’s leadership and discipline-specific exploration. Every semester several key Symposia are shared across all four cohorts in the WLP.

Cohort-specific Symposia in GEB are geared toward enabling further understanding and appreciation of key issues of interest relevant to international economics and business. In some semesters, Symposia programming has inspired deeper discussions around specific issues such as: "How does altruism relate to foreign aid," and "How do we evaluate the impact of micro-lending?"

A sampling of past Symposia includes:

  • Institute of Women's Policy Research: Discussion with the Vice-President of Research, Barbara Gault.
  • Woolly Mammoth Theatre: No Child acclaimed one-woman show written and performed by Nilaja Sun about teaching in public schools
  • Library of Congress: Inaugural reading by the U.S. Poet Laureate, Kay Ryan; followed by book signing and reception
  • West Wring Writers: Visit by Vinca LaFleur, former senior speechwriter in the Clinton White House
  • Kiva.org micro-lending project: Funded and researched individual entrepreneurs and their country macroeconomic fundamentals.
  • Movie Night in DC: "Pray the Devil Back to Hell," discussed the impact of the local women's movement on the peace process in Liberia.

Spring Semester

Course Area Credits
Economics 012 Social Science 3

ECON012

University Writing Writing 3
Symposium   1

WLP 110 and WLP 111

This course does not fulfill an academic requirement, but counts towards the students overall earned credit-hours.

The WLP Symposium is designed to supplement the academic component of the program with a wide variety of extra-curricular opportunities, many of which are exclusive to members of WLP. Symposia fall into two main categories: women’s leadership and discipline-specific exploration. Every semester several key Symposia are shared across all four cohorts in the WLP.

Cohort-specific Symposia in GEB are geared toward enabling further understanding and appreciation of key issues of interest relevant to international economics and business. In some semesters, Symposia programming has inspired deeper discussions around specific issues such as: "How does altruism relate to foreign aid," and "How do we evaluate the impact of micro-lending?"

A sampling of past Symposia includes:

  • Institute of Women's Policy Research: Discussion with the Vice-President of Research, Barbara Gault.
  • Woolly Mammoth Theatre: No Child acclaimed one-woman show written and performed by Nilaja Sun about teaching in public schools
  • Library of Congress: Inaugural reading by the U.S. Poet Laureate, Kay Ryan; followed by book signing and reception
  • West Wring Writers: Visit by Vinca LaFleur, former senior speechwriter in the Clinton White House
  • Kiva.org micro-lending project: Funded and researched individual entrepreneurs and their country macroeconomic fundamentals.
  • Movie Night in DC: "Pray the Devil Back to Hell," discussed the impact of the local women's movement on the peace process in Liberia.